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Sweet Water Foundation

Who We Are:
 
Sweet Water Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, opened its doors to the community
in December 2009. Sharing space in a repurposed warehouse in Bay View with the innovative and
dynamic for-profit aquaponic urban farm Sweet Water Organics, Sweet Water Foundation develops
intergenerational and interdisciplinary educational programming for sustainability with a focus on
the potential of urban agriculture and aquaponics in the 21st century city.
 
What We Believe:
 
Centered upon the fundamental concept of turning wastes into a community resource, we address
such topics as community and economic development, health/wellness concerns, the STEM
(Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines , and environmental stewardship
concerning local and global themes of food, soil, water, and energy. Our multi-faceted approach
opens up discussions on the future of cities by allowing the student to think critically about the
environment he or she has inherited.
 
What We Have Done:
 
Over the past year alone, more than 50 schools in the greater Milwaukee and Chicago area have
sought out the support of Sweet Water Foundation, gaining valuable educational experiences in
the field of urban agriculture and aquaponics especially as it supports curriculum and the STEM
disciplines. However, Sweet Water Foundation would like to increase the breadth of its work by
increasing the number of students and community members it reaches with its educational activities
and, ultimately, continuing to diversify the programs and projects we offer.
 
Where We Are Headed:
 
In the coming year, we are committed to increasing our education curriculum and STEM discipline into local schools and communities through education, innovation, and construction of aquaponics and urban farms. Through partnering projects with local schools and organizations, we strive to advance the knowledge of aquaponics and urban agriculture to help reduce local food scarcity issues, improve nutrition, and promote environmental stewardship. By helping construct urban farms, green houses, aquaponic systems, and community gardens, we wish to empower Milwaukee communities to take charge of their food needs and reinvent the farming business. 
 
 
What is the name of the presenter?: 
Jesse Blom
Presenter's phone number: 
262-501-0855
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$9006
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$37810
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$5000
How would a grant be used?: 
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
Sweet Water Foundation partners with local schools and communities to educate, innovate, and create urban farms to combat food scarcity and poor nutrition while addressing environmental concerns. We continually look for ways to educate students in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines using aquaponic and other urban farming techniques. By providing intergenerational and interdisciplinary educational programming, students, teachers, coaches, parents, and friends learn about sustainability, focusing on the potential of urban agriculture locally and globally. Sweet Water Foundation is committed to helping relieve food deserted areas through education and implementation of aquaponics and urban farming.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Center of Veterans Issues (CVI) and National Association for Black Veterans, Inc. (NABVETS) have partnered with Sweet Water Foundation for a program that has provided veterans ownership of a life-giving project, a potential for sustained food production, a chance to learn skills that are relevant in the workforce, an opportunity to make a difference in the community, and the peace of mind that comes from doing something positive for our neighbors and selves through a small scale agricultural system known as Barrel-Ponics. Goals: By maintaining focus, we can tailor this process to be of greatest benefit to veterans and to the community. The goals of this process are to: 1) provide enhanced therapeutic measures for returned veterans through interaction with living organisms, 2) train a devoted core of veterans in the construction and maintenance of an aquaponic system, and equip veterans as community stewards 3) establish a continuous source of healthy food at low cost, and 4) forge a partnership between organizations that provides for expanded opportunities in urban agriculture and aquaponics in the future. By expanding our previous work with CVI, adding to CVI's current program, we can help them meet their goal of providing food for their year round needs.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Emmanuel Pratt
James Godsil
Jesse Blom
Focus area of project: 
environment
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

The Water Quality and Quantity Management Project will hire a coordinator to develop public awareness materials and hands on training for citizen groups concerned about water quality and quality.  The Project will assist grass roots citizen groups to collaborate and share expertise and resources around monitoring in areas at risk due to industrial agricultural practices, and will develop a protocol for data collection that will provide credible information to the public and to agencies charged with oversight of water quality and quantity.

 

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Karen Wollenburg
Presenter's phone number: 
608-429-4169
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
Our fiscal sponsor is a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$2000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$2000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$5000
How would a grant be used?: 
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
Social justice inequities are evidenced in the environmental, economic, labor and health safety impacts of industrial agriculture practices on rural citizens. Local governmental bodies, small farmers, farm workers and those interested in clean air, water and land use have limited power or recourse to influence regulatory decisions and the quality of implementation of rules that critically impact their livelihood, health ,and the environment. The lack of monitoring and enforcement of rules has led to manure or silage spills and runoff resulting in contaminated wells, fish kills, polluted recreational waters, and algae blooms that in turn impact health and quality of life in Wisconsin. Factory farms have increased rapidly in Wisconsin over the last 10 years . To date there are 228 CAFO’s (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation) in Wisconsin. The Water Quality and Quality Monitoring Project will provide citizens groups concerned about the impact of industrial farming on water with a systematic set of procedures and a protocol to document monitoring information and provide credible evidence to regulatory agencies to support the monitoring function. The Project will also strengthen the coalition of citizens groups to consolidate their voice and power and provide information to the public promoting greater awareness of the environmental, social, health and economic issues underlying industrial agriculture as well as knowledge of sustainable agricultural alternatives.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
This Project would hire a Water Monitoring Coordinator to develop a water monitoring protocol and implement citizen training and state wide coordination of citizen advocacy groups to ensure credibility of water sampling and monitoring procedures. In addition the Coordinator would function as a focal point for group data collection and documentation of agricultural impacts on water quality. The Coordinator would keep advocacy groups apprised of what is happening with other state wide groups, relevant legislation and hearings, and work to increase communities ability to work together and impact public awareness and legislation surrounding agricultural impacts on water quality throughout the state. The Project goals are to: • mitigate water pollution and the depletion of water resources in areas at risk due to industrial farming practices • increase the capacity of concerned citizens to monitor and document the quality and quantity of local waterways and empower community groups to advocate for water standards and monitoring around large industrial farms. • Increase public awareness of water quality and quantity issues related to industrial farming practices. • Increase public accessibility to documentation of water quality and quantity in areas at risk of pollution from industrial farming practices • develop a water monitoring protocol that is seen as credible to media, to the agricultural industry, to regulating agencies, to Russcommunities, and to courts if necessary.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Jennifer Nelson
Edie Alert
Lamar Janes
Russ Tooley
Focus area of project: 
environment
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

9carrots offers a unique way for community and business to co-operate in the fight against climate change, while also working to increase economic localisation. Retailers choose upgrades that will make their business more energy efficient, or a specific renewable energy project they have chosen. We advertise them and consumers support them in reaching their goal. Each business commits 10% of the extra revenue they make from the extra 9carrots customers towards their target upgrade. 9carrots can also be used to direct funding to local non-profit groups working on sustainability issues in our community in any area of focus.

 

Milwaukee.9carrots.org is the new website featuring local businesses that are saving up to power down their energy use in lasting ways.  9carrots uses GIS mapping to connect customers to businesses that are committed to doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint through energy efficiency upgrades and building renewable energy systems. Customers who mention finding them on the site receive a special receipt which they can register online to track each businesses progress in reaching their goal.

 

9carrots provides businesses a way to gain attention for their concerns about the environment and work directly with the community to make an impact.  9carrots supports economic localisation and opens doors to conversation about the role of business in achieving energy and environmental sustainability at a community level.

 

9carrots has been developed and is supported by non-profit volunteer organisation in London, UK. Milwaukee is the first city in the US to use the 9carrots system.  A pilot program is also in development in Victoria, CA

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Michael Pettit
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$500
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
People matter. The powerful and important long term effects of the 9carrots project are the way in which it affects the culture of a local community, rather than simply the improvement in businesses' energy efficiency. The 9carrots project is a way of connecting your community to its supply chains, production methods, employment and financial decisions by setting up supportive relationships between the people and local businesses. Then, together, your community can begin working towards the changes it needs to make to become resilient to peak oil and Climate Change. 9carrots is a positive, friendly project. It offers individuals an easy, non-embarrassing way of coming out of their denial and participating in their community and its ethical decisions. Once they are participating, 9carrots progressively offers them more involvement in their local community groups and other avenues to a new lifestyle.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Funds are needed to print and photo copy materials used to train volunteers, promote the website to the public, and conduct the business operations of the program. Materials include: hand bills, flyers, posters, contracts, and instructional texts.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Michael Pettit
Barbara Richards
Focus area of project: 
environment
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Cream City Gardens

ccgwi on 2/26/2011

It will be an urban farm located at 13th in Mckinley ultimately raising fish and growing food for Food Pantries and the Meal Program for the Homeless shelter across the street.   We will also market product to area restaurants, cafes, delies, schools and more.  Our operations will be integrated into the development and training programs of both the Guest House and Friedens Community Ministries.

Phase I - Beging growing on the land Spring of 2011

Phase II - Build a greenhouse and class a facility covering almost an an acre to raise fish and grow food year round.

What is the name of the presenter?: 
David Johnson
Presenter's phone number: 
414-828-9625
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$3500
How would a grant be used?: 
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Energy Exchange

simonland on 2/25/2011

 

Mission

The Energy Exchange is a renewable energy resource facility designed to educate the public and policy makers about environmental landscaping practices and sustainable development.

 

Problem

In the past it has been standard policy of civil engineers, developers, and home owners to design and direct the natural water flow of the urban landscape off of the properties and into catch basins, storm sewers, and retention/detention ponds. This practice is wasteful and has contributed to the depletion of our underground aquifers and the degradation of our rivers and lakes by depositing harmful contaminants during rainstorm events.

 

Goals

The goal of the Energy Exchange and its partners is to help promote public awareness regarding these issues and to help facilitate change to the current mindset and policies, which will lead to more Low Impact Development (LID) and a better quality of life for all our citizens.

 

Facility

The Energy Exchange is located at 4121 S. 6thStreet. The site is water neutral and currently maintains over 7500 sq. ft.  of permeable pavement, 4000 sq. ft. of green roof, led lighting, 1100 sq. ft. of bioswales/rain gardens, 800 sq. ft. underground stone storage  and two 1,000 gallon rain water harvesting systems. In addition the center will also showcase solar arrays and geothermal heating.

 

Programs

The center will host workshops featuring speakers from around the state and country who are involved in Low Impact Development.  These specialist will help inform residents of ways to improve the environment while also benefiting their businesses or homes. We are also developing a downspout disconnect program offering  rain barrels and other sustainable products to assist in the transition.

 

Partners

American Rivers, Gateway to Milwaukee, MMSD, City of Milwaukee DPW, City of Milwaukee DCD,

Elected Officials, Neighborhood Associations, Milwaukee County / UW Extension.

 

Funding Request

We request funding for administrative and operational expenses. The facility is currently occupied and funded by Simon Landscape Company. In order for the Energy Exchange to expand, Simon Landscape will need to relocate and the Energy Exchange must become self-sustaining.

  

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Bryan Simon
Presenter's phone number: 
414-234-0581
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
Our fiscal sponsor is a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$0
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$80000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$30000
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
In order to reduce the flow of raw sewage into our rivers and lakes we must first change the mindset of policy makers and property owners. It is a common misconception that implimenting environmentally friendly technologies are too expensive. Allthough the initial cost is slightly higher, the long term savings more than pay for the higher initial cost. For example: The City of Milwaukee charges a storm water management fee to all residential and commercial property owners. This fee is based on the amount of hard surfaces (rooftops, asphalt and concrete). For residential home owners this fee is relatively insignificant as the city only charges one ERU regardless of the property size or amount of hard surface, but for commercial property owners the fee can be significant as the current charge is $14.50 per ERU (1600 s.f. of hard surface). A 10 acre site could pay as much as much as $20,000.00 annually. By containing the rainwater onsite these fees can be reduced by 60 to 80 percent, which over a seven to ten year period would more than pay for itself.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Refer to the program section above.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Bryan Simon (Simon Landscape)
Sean Foltz (American Rivers)
Joel Reinders (Reinders Inc.)
Focus area of project: 
environment
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Many FCYI Center Supportive Housing program participants are currently underemployed and have monthly financial obligations that are not being met by the funding source. Currently FCYI Center has a fee-for-service contract with Milwaukee Wraparound to provide the following services: Life Skills Group/Individual, Supportive Independent Living, and Supportive Independent Living Youth with Dependent.Currently FCYI Center has youth and their children in its Supportive Independent Living Program/Housing.  It costs approximately $1500 to start a youth in our housing program. Each youth has monthly financial obligations of approximately $700. Although FCYI Center subsidizes the youth’s rent, food assistance, and life skills training, there are still many financial expenses that FCYI Center is unable to provide full funding for such as laundry money, personal hygiene products, money for recreational or social activities, utilities, transportation cost, or other households products.  Most of our teens work lower paying part time jobs as they are under 18 yrs of age. While they have sufficient income to cover current expenses, it is difficult for them to effectively save money for the time when they are responsible for their full rent or for emergencies. We are seeking funding for youth who are aging or have aged out of care to enter our Supervised Independent Living Program or our Homeless Foster Youth Program. Funds would be utilized to for security deposits and startup costs for youth entering  the program. We currently have no funding available to serve former foster youth who have been discharged from the system but are unable to afford the startup and support services for housing. Some of the teen moms are unable to establish an address to receive public assistance on their own. These youth often end up being exploited by family or other friends for providing them a couch to sleep on.  Youth would not only receive housing but a full curriculum of life skills training to ensure that they have the knowledge and skill to understand how to maintain a household, employment, their own safety and well-being.

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Alisha Hunt
Presenter's phone number: 
414-301-2102
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)4 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$305000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$375000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$30000
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
The change comes in addressing the need for youth to understand how to access resources, how to manage their money, not just how to get a job but how to keep a job. We teach them about their rights and the law. Youth aging out of foster care would be equipped with skills needed to become positive contributing members of society. National studies by Chapin Hall and Casey Family Programs indicate that without intervention, many foster children aging out of foster care experience homelessness, unemployment, exploitation and incarceration. The Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare believes that youth are learning life skills in the group homes and foster homes when in fact, there are no clear definitions in DCF 56 or 57 which dictate specific life skills that are to be taught to youth in care. Current life skills programming is being taught in a group setting whereas we teach the children one on one based on a thorough assessment of that youths needs. It's more than just can you cook or open a bank account, but do you know if you need insurance, do you understand your check stub, what are you agreeing to when you sign a lease agreement?
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
In the Supported Housing Programs, youth would be placed in an affordable one bedroom apartment. FCYI would provide: Security deposit and subsidized rent for the 1st through 3rd months at 100%, 4th month’s rent at 70%, 5th month’s rent at 50% FCYI does not contribute for the 6th month’s rent unless youth is not being discharged from foster care in that month, if this is the case FCYI will pay rent at 30% until the month of discharge from foster care. Youth is responsible for 100% of rent and utilities for their last full month prior to their discharge month. Up to $75 per month towards utilities Up to $125 per month towards groceries or until food stamps are obtained Up to $50 a month towards phone bill until employment is obtained. Up to $200 move in stipend Twin bed and dresser Up to $40 per month for laundry until employment is obtained Up to $50 per month for personal hygiene/household products Bus pass until employment is obtained Youth will receive weekly individual case management services from an Emancipation Specialist. The goal of the Emancipation Specialist is to prepare youth for discharge from the foster care system and teach youth daily living skills utilizing the PAYA Curriculum. This includes addressing housing, employment, and educational needs. Youth have access to a 24 hour emergency line for assistance.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
James A Pekrul CEO
Maria Stevens Board President
Focus area of project: 
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

The 13th District Garden Association Neighborhood Improvement Program Request for Grant.

Summary

The Garden District Association’s purpose is to relieve the community’s shortage beautiful landscaping, enhance the quality of life for the 13th District residents, educate and engage our youth, and strengthen the economy of the city's local neighborhoods. The Association’s focus is to support the efforts of our community-based organizations to implement these initiatives at the neighborhood level.

Program Impact

The purpose of the Neighborhood Improvement Program is to support a mix of citywide and local community development activities as well as offer technical assistance, policy research, and advocacy within the 13 district neighborhoods of Milwaukee. The funding if made available will assist our community leaders and residents, including low and moderate-income residents and our community-based grassroots organizations to develop economically-viable communities and provide decent, safe, beautiful neighborhoods, in addition to providing functional public land development for all community residents, without discrimination.

Priority ranking will be given to projects that serve as models for long-term, city-wide, and nation-wide programs. The projects range from one to a maximum of three years to complete. All physical labor is donated time by area residents, their families, and friends. Much of the materials needed are donated by local businesses. Routine operating and administrativeexpenses, including project-related legal and professional fees,will be using some of the grant funding money. Our primary focus will be the installation of a water supply in our community garden area. The secondary focus will be the completion of the public garden walkways and plantings. Additional grant funds would be used to complete the arbor and trellis area of the garden.

The Garden District Association has an elected governing Board of Directors and an Executive Chairperson who is responsible for the management of the organization. We are a 501C3 organization.The GDNA is in partnership with The Energy Exchange and the Green Street Program Business Partners.

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Valerie Stevens
Presenter's phone number: 
414-328-0702
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$65000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$100000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$30000
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
The GDNA endeavors to work toward establishing and maintaining the 13th District as Milwaukee’s Garden District Historical Landmark status. We are an example of a successful community initiative, involving the area’s seniors in cooperation with the area’s youth in an effort to promote sustainablepartnerships and inter-generational respect. These efforts support establishing and maintaining independent Neighborhood Associations in the Garden District that improve the quality of life for all Garden District residents, provide family-centered events, and generates an affinity for civic involvement, such as meet and greet events for District 13 political candidates and school board contenders. The GDNA provides community education in conservation techniques, such as recycling rain water, energy conservation planting strategies, and bio-swales.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Our primary focus will be the installation of a water supply in our community garden area. The secondary focus will be the completion of the public garden walkways and plantings. Additional grant funds would be used to complete the arbor and trellis area of the garden.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Chairman: Connie Wilson
Vice Chairman: Micheal Plumley
Treasurer: Dean Brown
Secretary: Jennifer Gordon
Ex Officio: Alderman Terry Witkowski
Grant Writer: Valerie Stevens
The Garden Committee: Bryan Simon
Neighborhood Association Committee: Sue Beecher
Civic and Educational Committee: Julia O'Conner
Board Member: Jim Baker
Board Member; Chris Kuester
Board Member: Chester Kuzminski
Focus area of project: 
environment
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Specific, practical, and affordable solutions are needed to provide water for community gardens in Milwaukee. Community gardens generate grass-roots involvement that promotes the values and ideals of the Wisconsin Community Fund: social and environmental justice, equity, involvement of diverse groups including the often powerless. Gardens enable people to grow food and grow community.  In 2010, the City announced it would terminate access to hydrants for community gardens, ending a 20+ year practice. A coalition led by Milwaukee Urban Gardens, the Victory Garden Initiative and UW Extension Service organized a large community meeting in July 2010. Over 100 grass-roots gardeners, citizens and community organizations attended. Through ensuing actions by these grass-roots individuals and groups, the City has backed off a definite date for terminating hydrant use for gardens. But it is clear that the long-term solution is to develop rain-harvesting solutions to meet the water needs of community gardens, which in turn empower grass roots efforts, social and environmental justice. Environmental justice assures that people of all races and incomes have access to a clean, healthy environment and there is not a disparate negative environmental impact on neighborhoods with predominantly minority or low-income persons.

Rain harvesting solutions, as explained in the proposal,  are needed to keep community gardens productive and viable. The efforts to develop advocacy and specific rain harvesting solutions have, to date, depended on volunteers and nonprofit staff that have now reached their limit. Funding is needed to undertake the project that will identify and develop solutions.

This grant proposal represents a multi-disciplinary and multi-organization effort to generate specific solutions to a community need.  The leadership team assembled in this proposal has the demonstrated skills and abilities and access to resources to achieve the stated objectives. 

This project meets important needs for local citizens who are growing food for their families. It develops solutions that will work throughout the city, including in low-income neighborhoods. It will enable community gardens to grow and prosper, which will also address the needs of neighborhoods with an abundance of vacant lots resulting from foreclosures and disinvestment. These are also neighborhoods that experienced flooding problems last year, and will help to address those problems. In short, this project helps to solve several real problems in Milwaukee through a coalition-building approach that involves grass roots people including people of color and low-income persons.

The project involves three phases:

  1. Complete an inventory of community gardens in Milwaukee,
  2. Develop prototypes to address rain water harvesting needs in the key types of gardens identified in the inventory, and
  3. Prepare “how-to” guides including cost estimates for the various solutions. These guides will be published on-line for public access.

Milwaukee Urban Gardens (MUG) will act as the funding conduit and the three parties listed on this application – MUG, the Victory Garden Initiative (VGI), and Janice Christensen – will head the effort. Collaboration is needed to carry out the project, which necessarily involves city government agencies. Grass-roots organizations will be involved on the Steering Committee.  

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Bruce Wiggins & Jan Christensen
Presenter's phone number: 
414-431-1585
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$71000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$73000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$10000
How would a grant be used?: 
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
Community gardens and urban agriculture change our industrial food system, promote equity, good health, and healthy communities. They are particularly important in low-income communities. Community gardens beautify neighborhoods and beautify lots that are problems in many minority and low-income neighborhoods. Community gardens are community-building activities that inherently promote grass roots social change. Milwaukee Urban Gardens (MUG) is a land trust created to enable and support community gardens through securing the land for gardens and providing assistance to neighborhood groups. MUG is the funding conduit applying on behalf of a coalition of persons and groups including the Victory Garden Initiative. Jan Christensen, a community organizer and central figure in the urban agriculture and good food revolution in Milwaukee, is also a key organizer of this project.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Specific, practical, and affordable solutions are needed to provide water for community gardens in Milwaukee. Rain harvesting solutions, as explained in the proposal, are needed to keep community gardens productive and viable. The project involves three phases: 1. Complete an inventory of community gardens in Milwaukee 2. Develop prototypes to address rain water harvesting needs in the key types of gardens identified in the inventory 3. Prepare “how-to” guides including cost estimates for the various solutions. These guides will be published on-line for public access. See the more detailed summary above and also the proposal attached. the proposal provides background on the challenge, and how the proposed project meets the challenge, along with details of the work in each phase.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Bruce Wiggins - Exec. Dir., Milwaukee Urban Gardens
Gretchen Meade - Director, Victory Garden Initiative
Jan Christensen - Community Organizer
Focus area of project: 
racism
environment
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Irving Gardens!

jcpaa200 on 2/25/2011

 

Janus College Preparatory & Arts Academies (JCPAA) intends to be a not-for-profit independent school designed to prepare students for a post-secondary education and a career.             

JCPAA will be the first arts-focused, college preparatory charter school in Milwaukee. The school design caters to the needs of students from all socioeconomic backgrounds. Janus provides an academic program that opens doors for lower income high school students by equipping them with the  skills, knowledge, and specific resources they need to gain entrance into college and secure financial aid at a college or university of their choice.  We are proud to potentially be a part of a  pool of independent schools that are attempting to increase the number of low income and often minority children to choose college as their first option for career.  

 As a school, we recognize that in order for learning to occur, and for academic needs to be met, the student's basic needs must be met first before they can successfully take advantage of educational opportunities made available to them.  In order to educate and strengthen student's talents and academic skills, the roadblocks that exists in their lives have to be removed or moved out of the way.  When children have support and basic needs met, schools have a real chance of making a difference. We are committed to creating the conditions necessary for all students to become successful, lifelong learners.

Working in collaboration with community based organizations  for their supportive services will help in moving the obstacles that get in the way of student learning and achievement.  Our goal is to provide our students and parents community services that are right on campus. A “Center for Learning”. 

 There are several areas in our Milwaukee communities that are at-risk and in immediate need of alternative educational options.  These areas identified by their zip codes have a population of residents who are suffering from poverty,extreme high unemployment, teen and single parents, high dropout rates, and inadequate education. 

JCPAA is committed to making a difference in our community.  Our "difference" is a Community Garden called Irving Gardens. We plan to create this community garden on 27 & Locust Streets.  This geographic area, 53210, is an area in need.  High poverty, high crime rates, few people are homeowners, high unemployment rate, and low high school graduation rates.  

 JCPAA will take an innovative approach to address this community reality through Irving Gardens Service Learning Project.

Service-Learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.

The core concept driving this educational strategy is that by combining service objectives and learning objectives, along with the intent to show measurable change in both the recipient and the provider of the service, the result is a radically-effective transformative method of teaching students.Community members, students, and educators everywhere are discovering that service-learning offers all its participants a chance to take part in the active education of its youth while simultaneously addressing the concerns, needs, and hopes of their community.

Why Irving Gardens?

 Educational opportunities

Hands-on exposure to community gardens can teach children about the sources of fresh produce, demonstrate community stewardship and introduce the importance of environmental sustainability. Gardens are also great places for children to learn math, business and communication skills through applied activities and interaction. Integrating environment-based education into academic programs improves reading, math, science and social studies test scores and reduces discipline problems

 Community pride and ownership

The safety and vitality of a healthy community relies heavily upon the invested pride and ownership that residents have for their neighborhood. Community gardens offer a focal point for neighborhood organizing, and can lead to community-based efforts to deal with other social concerns.They give youth a safe place to interact with peers,while involving them in beneficial activities. Community gardens can increase safety by providing more eyes on the street . Communities that develop semi-public spaces where people can become actively engaged in their community have significantly lower crime rates than neighborhoods where these amenities do not exist.

 Property values and tax revenues

Green space adds property value to neighborhoods by beautifying spaces and creating more attractive places for people to walk and enjoy life outdoors. People are willing to pay more to live in places with these amenities.  

Nutrition: Food security and access

 Community gardens provide residents of underserved communities the opportunity to grow their own fruits and vegetables, increasing access and affordability.

 Creating more open space

 Community gardens are an inexpensive way for cities to mitigate this disparity and recapture unused land for the purpose of beautification. A neglected vacant lot can be transformed into a garden where people of all ages can grow food together and strengthen community ties.

 Community gardens are affordable

The annual cost of most community gardens are minimal because residents, rather than city employees, are responsible for maintaining the gardens.

 Community services

 Community gardens can be integrated into broader community projects such as after-school programs for children, activities for the elderly and resources for food banks and homeless shelters.

We are a team of dedicated professionals working to raise the bar in public education.  Janus College Preparatory & Arts Academies, Inc strategic delivery of  programs  promotes and provides the opportunities needed for students to participate in the economy, our society, and city. Our community does not have time to wait for things to get better and change.  Change starts now!

 

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Terrise Irving & Valerie Benton
Presenter's phone number: 
414-305-2563
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
Our fiscal sponsor is a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$400
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$0
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$3000
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
JCPAA is social change by incorporating Service-Learning as a part of our curriculum. Service Learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. The core concept driving this educational strategy is that by combining service objectives and learning objectives, along with the intent to show measurable change in both the recipient and the provider of the service, the result is a radically-effective transformative method of teaching students. Community members, students, and educators everywhere are discovering that service-learning offers all its participants a chance to take part in the active education of its youth while simultaneously addressing the concerns, needs, and hopes of their community.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Recruiting and Screening Volunteers: press release, posters, announcements, radio public service announcements, signs. Organizing and Training Volunteers Visibility, Publicity, and Public Relations: newspaper feature story, signs & banners, events. Planning: materials, tools(shovels, hoes, rakes,spades, hose, nozzle...), seeds, seedlings, organic material, containers, baskets, & soil test kit.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Valerie Benton
Contessa Cole
Terrise Irving
Bria Grant
Tracey Jo Whitmore
Bently Turner
Focus area of project: 
environment
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Introduction

The Immigrant Workers' Union works in various, yet related areas empowering low-wage, immigrant and undocumented workers to improve their conditions and those of their families. We recognize that the pressures on immigrant families are complex and result from the intersection of race, class, gender, sexuality, culture clash, and often lack of "papers." Our projects include: a 1-800 Help Line, Black Latino Unity Project, Immigration Reform, Youth, Labor and Tenant rights, Education, and May Day. We are a very small and humble organization with a lot of ideas and a ton of ambition. We are an entirely volunteer organization and do no have any paid staff. We propose to use any grant money to expand and strengthen several key project areas.

Methods

Our project areas have each originated in one of two ways: the first is through identifying a need in the community and then  incubation by the members and steering committee; the second is through groups of community members approaching IWU for the tools and support they need to address issues they have. For example, a year and a half ago we began collaborating with a group Latino parents who approached us regarding problems they were having with the administration and the quality of education in general. Through leadership development, outreach, and Parents' Conferences,  the parents effectively helped stop major proposed cuts to bilingual and programs that affect low income and students of color, in the Madison Metropolitan School District. This is just one example but there are many more.

Another area we are builiding power in is our Black Latino Unity Project. This is an example of a project that was created by the organization itself in response to several focus groups, personal conversations, and local events (ie a fight between Black and Latino students at a local high school). We identified a need in our community for dialogue between two communities that face similar oppression. Through a yearly Black Latino Unity Picnic and bi-monthly focus groups, as well as a newsletter, IWU has worked to bring together low income Black and Latinos to discuss how their communities can better work together to address racism, racial disparities in education, and more.

Project(s)

Recently we were contacted by a group of Latino tentants where the manager/owner opened the doors of several people's apartments to FBI and ICE agents without a search warrant. At their request we facilitated a dialogue between the tenants and the manager/owner in which the tenants demanded and successfully gained immediate termination of contracts if desired. Emboldened by this success, and in a low income neighborhood that is mostly Black and Latino, the tenants identified a list of other concerns they have and that their neighbors have regarding tenants' rights. This is an area that we'd like to strengthen and expand by taking a more systematic approach in creating awareness and organizing our constituency to be better able to defend their rights as tenants. In addition, this will be a tangible way for IWU to cross-pollinate and further the dialouge between Blacks and Latinos.

In addition, 2010 was the first year of our very successful Summer Youth Program in which over 25 youth completed over one thousand hours of community serivice. We'd like to expand this program in 2011 to include more skill building workshops such as youth media so that youth begin to feel more empowered to tell their stories and use both TV and Radio to organize their peers.

Lastly, we'd like to be able to put some money towards general operating expenses. We are funded primarily through member dues and our yearly banquet fundraiser and do not have the resources at this moment to actively seek out grants which wouldn't interfere with our work at the same time.

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Yvonne Geerts and Anjelica Alvarez
Presenter's phone number: 
608-335-0357
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
Our fiscal sponsor is a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$3500
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$3500
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$7000
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
no
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
The Immigrant Workers' Union is a grassroots organization that works to defend and organize immigrant workers in their struggle for better conditions for themselves and their families. We believe that those directly affected must be the agents of lasting and meaningful change in our communities and that we must always connect the dots across the struggles of all oppressed people. The Immigrant Workers' Union works to be a tool for the community using a strategy that informs people on the issues, organizes people into committees in their workplaces, their schools and their neighborhoods, and acts on issues that affect us all.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Several mailings of 2 thousand people each; meeting space rental; food; training material; member cards, Landline telephone so that members needn't use personal cellphones; paper; toner; internet; rent; 1-800 number; office equipment and supplies; insurance; fees.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Jorge Carrera
Alex Gillis
Marisol Gonzaleaz
Yvonne Geerts
Clarissa Pearson
Jessica Ruiz
Jocelyn Gonzalez
Focus area of project: 
racism
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

The mission of Pink Banana Theatre Co. is to provide professional opportunities to emerging artists. Since it was created, over 300 emerging artists have received the chance to perform, direct, produce, write or design for Milwaukee's arts community through Pink Banana Theatre. Its performances not only instill confidence and skill in Milwaukee's emerging artists, but also provide entertainment and community involvement for the public.  

The purpose of a WCF grant is to fund Pink Banana Theatre's 2011 One-Act Plays. Pink Banana Theatre has several specific objectives it would like to accomplish through the 2011 One-Act Plays:

Objective 1: Allow amateur actors, directors and playwrights to take part in a live production

Objective 2: Modestly compensate artists for their time, dedication and talent put toward the One-Act Plays

Objective 3: Provide quality local entertainment to the Milwaukee area while building a sense of community 

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Nita Schuelke
Presenter's phone number: 
414-403-6271
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$8000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$10000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$3000
How would a grant be used?: 
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
The target population for participants in the one-acts is amateur artists of all ages, races, ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds and other demographics. Theatre benefits from diversity and Pink Banana Theatre encourages everyone to audition who would like to. Pink Banana Theatre is especially interested in providing unique theatre experiences for the public. Renowned theatre companies may not have the ability to pursue creative avenues that do not fit the “traditional” theatre idea. In this regard, Pink Banana Theatre has the flexibility to offer low-cost, original performances to the Milwaukee public, ensuring that a wider range of people have access to cultural events and experiences. In Arts & Economic Prosperity III: The Economic Impact of Nonprofits Arts and Culture Organizations and Their Audiences, the Wisconsin Arts Board found that “the nonprofit arts and culture industry is an economic driver in communities.” Thus, not only is Pink Banana Theatre providing benefits to artists and arts lovers; it is strengthening the Milwaukee-area economy and building a sense of community as well.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Pink Banana Theatre’s One-Act Plays are unique; it is the only Milwaukee-area theatre currently offering this experience. Every year Pink Banana Theatre has an open call for one-act play submissions revolving around a certain theme – the theme for 2011’s One-Act Plays is Higher Education. Any non-professional playwright can submit a play and have the chance to see his or her work come to life on stage. Similarly, open auditions are held for amateur actors for the One-Act Plays, and anyone with an interest in directing, stage managing, producing, designing a set, etc. has an equal chance of being involved with the production. This open attitude toward participation contributes to a sense of community and excites amateur artists about the potential for finding artistic opportunities here in Milwaukee, rather than having to move from the city to pursue their dreams. The education gained regarding putting on a theatre production is invaluable; so is the confidence and self-esteem acquired. By funding this project, the Wisconsin Community Fund will not just be funding a theatre experience for the Milwaukee public – it will be funding the learning opportunity of a lifetime for someone yearning to express him or herself in a safe, creative way.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Nita Schuelke
Matt Kemple
Rose Wasielewski
Renee Pasciak
Alexis Hagquist
Focus area of project: 
racism
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Crawford County Restorative Justice works to provide opportunities for resolution and healing for people experiencing conflicts. Victim-offender conferencing, as well as community and neighborhood mediation have been offered in a multi-county region for about 10 years. With a new program director since mid-2010, CCRJ is looking to branch out to include 1) restorative services for prisoners in the Prairie du Chien prison and 2) peer mediation in Milwaukee Public Schools.

1) Crawford County Restorative Justice has the unique opportunity to affect neighborhoods throughout the state through prison programming.  Prairie du Chien Correctional Institution houses 500 minimum and medium security inmates, many working toward reentry. Currently 180 of those incarcerated men committed their crime in the Milwaukee area. Some return to the city upon release. Prisoners expressed interests in writing letters of apology and contributing to community projects.

2) The Milwaukee Public Schools offer free peer mediation training to any school that requests it. One of our staff has created a PowerPoint on the multiple benefits of peer mediation programs in schools based on a literature review of the research. This could be presented to staff at any Milwaukee school that did not have a peer mediation program, if interest was indicated. The effort would be made in coordination with the Milwaukee Public Schools Violence Prevention Program who would then conduct the training.

Although restorative ideas are not embraced by the mainstream justice and corrections systems or society at large, we are strong believers in restorative justice as a worthwhile way to help those who are disenfranchised.  Our dedicated group of volunteers and two staff focus our efforts to effect restorative principles that offer greater functionality, long-term benefits and less cost than the traditional justice system. Beyond the human decency inherent in restorative justice, it is also more practical. It works!

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Robin Cline / Cindy Thomas
Presenter's phone number: 
608-642-2581
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
Our fiscal sponsor is a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$17000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$24000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$3000
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
Restorative justice offers alternatives to traditional punitive measures decreed by the courts. Instead of disciplinary actions often involving periods of imprisonment, willing victims and offenders are encouraged to meet face-to-face with trained community volunteers. Victims can relate the impact of the crime to the offender, express their feelings about the offense and its aftermath, and directly inform the offender of their needs for reparation and healing. Offenders can become more aware of the impact of their actions, and be accountable directly to the victim – by having the opportunity to apologize, and by taking direct steps to repair the damage and heal the wounds caused by their unlawful actions. Community members can set standards of behavior, and support the individual and societal efforts toward positive change and reintegration. Research studies have shown that a high percentage of offenders who participate in victim-offender conferencing do not enter or reenter the prison system.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
1) After an initial restorative justice seminar held in December with the inmates in the prison, it was apparent that many inmates long to offer something to their victims and/or communities in recompense for their offenses. Several men expressed their certainty that their victims or home neighborhoods would not want contact with them, but that they would like to still offer something back to society. We would like to facilitate brainstorming sessions with inmates, prison officials, and community members to create collaboration between agencies, communities in need of services, inmates who want to offer services and prison employees who may coordinate restorative programming. An important part of restorative programming is that the participants create the project concepts; they feel ownership of the efforts. Ideas that have been presented by community members include volunteer work within the community such as park clean up and public art, such as a mural. Projects that may be possible within the prison fence may include building garden boxes for a community garden or producing items needed for homeless shelters, food banks, or schools. One project idea includes produce grown in a community garden. Inmates help to set up and prep the garden, than volunteers can donate garden yield to a soup kitchen, food pantry or urban school. Perhaps garden boxes could be made and delivered to urban elementary schools. Prison staff has recently cut victim impact curriculum from programming. In an effort to maintain some amount of victim impact programming an invitation has been made to Crawford County Restorative Justice to facilitate voluntary apology letter writing workshops. This event will provide an opportunity for community members and university students to enter the prison and to interact with inmates. It will be a powerfully positive experience for all parties. __ 2) CCRJ would also like to expand its services to include peer mediation in schools. Students having a conflict are given the choice of visiting the principal or participating in peer mediation. A form of conflict resolution, peer mediation provides an avenue for two students to serve as neutral mediators for two other students who are having a conflict. Each person listens as the other expresses their side of the story and then together arrive at an agreement, including a written contract for peacefully coexisting in the school. Rather than an expulsion, suspension or detention and another fight the next week, students get to the bottom of their conflict and do not normally fight again. Contracts studied 3 and 12 months later were found to be honored in more than 90% of cases. Research shows schools that implement peer mediation programs experience many benefits including reduced expulsions, suspensions and detentions, more time for administrators and teachers, better student self esteem, overall improvement in school climate, higher academic performance, easing of ethnic tensions, and development of communication skills and a sense of civic responsibility. The Milwaukee Public Schools offer free peer mediation training to any school that requests it. One of our staff has created a PowerPoint on the multiple benefits of peer mediation programs in schools based on a literature review of the research. This could be presented to staff at any Milwaukee school that did not have a peer mediation program, if interest was indicated. The effort would be made in coordination with the Milwaukee Public Schools Violence Prevention Program who would then conduct the training.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Alice Boehm
Russell Gilbert
Lila Marmel
Lynn Schreck
Don Stirling
Robin Cline, Program Director
Cindy Thomas, Grant Writer
Focus area of project: 
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Mission

Tessa’s Black Entertainment & Youth Center (TBEY) strengthens youth and young adults through exposure to the arts and opportunities for creative expression.  Youth and young adults ages 6-19 receive professional arts instruction, enjoy performances and exhibits, and receive tutoring, mentoring and coaching to achieve academically and pursue their interest in the arts.

We accomplish our mission:

§         Professional instruction and arts education is offered through after-school and summer programs allowing children and young adults to express and develop their unique talents in a culturally diverse offering of visual arts, dance, music and theatre programs.

§         Exposure to the artsthrough performances, attendance at arts performances, galleries and events and visits to professionals and instructors working in the arts inspires an appreciation of the arts.

§         Tutoring and mentoringis offered to students to ensure academic and personal growth success,andcoaching is offered to students seeking secondary educational opportunities in the arts.

Vision

Whether our students become artists themselves, work in an arts-related field, enjoy the arts as patrons or support the arts through donations, our vision is for the arts to contribute positively to young people’s lives.

Our Model – Explore, Engage & Express

TBEY offers education, information, and instruction with context and free expression with fundamentals. 

Our three-pronged approach:

  • Students explore variations within visual arts, dance, music and theatre through education
  • Students engage through professional instruction, as visitors to arts performances, galleries and events, visits to colleges and discussions with professionals who work in the arts.
  • Students express their individual unique talents through practice and performance. 

Need

Current research shows arts education can play a critical role in a child’s academic and social development. Well-designed and executed arts education leads to improved academic performance, builds skills necessary for workplace success, and has a positive influence on the lives of students. In addition, research and evaluation of successful arts programs has demonstrated that access to and participation in the arts helps decrease and prevents negative behavior by at-risk youth.  (Americans for the Arts www.artsusa.org). 

As arts programs in Milwaukee schools continue to be cut, organizations like TBEY are stepping in and providing an important alternative for parents.

Achievements

§         Over 250 children and young adults have received professional arts training from 20 community artists.  

§         More than 42 children and young adults have showcased their blossoming talents in performances.

§         Our Annual Summer Dance Concert – A Journey through Dance – has been attended by more than 300 community members in its first two years

§         85% of our studentshave increased academic performance by 25% or more through tutoring support.

§         Two of our studentsare currently enrolled in college level arts programs.

§         Our students have participated in 30 community events and field trips, and they have performed at the Summer of Peace for Change Rally, Peace Alliance and Olsen Arts Theatre Group.

 

Programs

Arts Education and Instruction

§         Visual Arts program includes painting, sculpting, ceramics and airbrushing techniques.  

§         Dance program focuses on providing opportunities to discover various dance forms including ballet, tap African, Modern dance and Hip-Hop. 

§         New York, New York Theatre programexplores various acting styles in both musicals and plays and teaches techniques such as voice projection, articulation, and script reading. Students perform in a play. 

§         Range Rover and Clef-Hanger Music programtrains students to be vocalists by teaching breathing, annunciation, and tonality techniques. In addition, students are exposed to various music genres like jazz, gospel, pop, and R & B. 

 

Exposure

§         Arts Performances – Students have the opportunity to participate in performances as well as attend performances and exhibits.

§         Professions in the Arts – Students visit colleges and talk with professionals who work in the arts.

 

Support

§         Tutoring – Students receive tutoring and assistance with homework before class.

§         Mentoring – Students are paired with community members who have similar backgrounds, skills, and interests in various art forms. Through this program, students are able to receive guidance, encouragement and resources towards their long-term academic and career goals.

§         Coaching - Students who wish to pursue post-secondary arts education receive assistance with applications to colleges.

 

2010 Goals

§         Provide a $3,000 annual stipend to every instructor, totaling $60,000.

§         Increase our scholarship fund by $14,400 to allow 40 additional students to attend TBEY.

§         Grow annual revenue to $200,000 in 2012/2013.

 

How You Can Help!

Visit a class!  See the impact the arts has on children and young adults for yourself. 

Attend or sponsor!  Our 2nd Annual Concert “A Journey through Dance” which will be held on September 3rd.

Sponsor a Student!  Make a financial donation of $360 for a student to attend one full year of classes.

Donate!  We always need items like used instruments, art supplies, dance attire, props or computers.

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Contessa Cole, Founder & Executive Director
Presenter's phone number: 
414-467-6741
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$10000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$15000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$2000
How would a grant be used?: 
General Operating Expenses
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
Current research shows arts education can play a critical role in a child’s academic and social development. Well-designed and executed arts education leads to improved academic performance, builds skills necessary for workplace success, and has a positive influence on the lives of students. In addition, research and evaluation of successful arts programs has demonstrated that access to and participation in the arts helps decrease and prevents negative behavior by at-risk youth. (Americans for the Arts www.artsusa.org). As arts programs in Milwaukee schools continue to be cut, organizations like TBEY are stepping in and providing an important alternative for parents.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Programs Arts Education and Instruction § Visual Arts program includes painting, sculpting, ceramics and airbrushing techniques. § Dance program focuses on providing opportunities to discover various dance forms including ballet, tap African, Modern dance and Hip-Hop. § New York, New York Theatre program explores various acting styles in both musicals and plays and teaches techniques such as voice projection, articulation, and script reading. Students perform in a play. § Range Rover and Clef-Hanger Music program trains students to be vocalists by teaching breathing, annunciation, and tonality techniques. In addition, students are exposed to various music genres like jazz, gospel, pop, and R & B. Exposure § Arts Performances – Students have the opportunity to participate in performances as well as attend performances and exhibits. § Professions in the Arts – Students visit colleges and talk with professionals who work in the arts. Support § Tutoring – Students receive tutoring and assistance with homework before class. § Mentoring – Students are paired with community members who have similar backgrounds, skills, and interests in various art forms. Through this program, students are able to receive guidance, encouragement and resources towards their long-term academic and career goals. § Coaching - Students who wish to pursue post-secondary arts education receive assistance with applications to colleges.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Alicia Phillips
Navalle Childs
Myesha Cole
Focus area of project: 
education
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines

Equality Wisconsin Fund is requesting $6,000 from Wisconsin Community Fund to expand its LGBT-Latino Family Unity Project, which aims to increase the acceptance of LGBT families in the Latino community, and mobilize non-Hispanic LGBT people to act in solidarity with Latino families and workers.

What is the name of the presenter?: 
Lizzi Dahlk
Presenter's phone number: 
414-431-1306
Presenter's email address: 
Do you plan to request a grant from Wisconsin Community Fund?: 
yes
If yes, is your organization a 501(c)3 OR do you ave a fiscal sponsor that is? Are you a 501(c)4?: 
We are a 501(c)3 organization
Total amount of 2010 annual budget?: 
$53000
Total amount of 2011 annual budget?: 
$61000
Total amount of proposed grant?: 
$6000
How would a grant be used?: 
Project or Program Expenses
Would a grant be used for an organization located in, working in, and/or benefiting residents of the great Milwaukee area?: 
yes
Explain how your organization’s work is social change and social justice work.: 
Equality Wisconsin Fund is an equal rights organization organizing for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Wisconsin. We secure family recognition for gay and lesbian families from the government and private employers, win nondiscrimination protections, and promote stronger ties with faith and people of color communities. Past campaigns have secured domestic partner benefits at the City of Milwaukee (2001) and Milwaukee Public Schools (2008), added transgender protections in employment and housing for Milwaukee residents (2007), and secured state funding for non-HIV health needs for South Central and Southeastern Wisconsin (2007). Equality Wisconsin Fund’s LGBT-Latino Family Unity Project increases the acceptance of LGBT families in the Latino community. Our nationally-funded “Voices of Faith” project decreases religion-based homophobia through congregation-based action and a clergy council. To increase access to employer family health benefits, we produced the first scholarly study of domestic partner benefits (http://equalitywi.org/news/8) and promoted it at chambers of commerce and similar groups; using information from the study, we are organizing to end the de facto ban on domestic partner coverage in Wisconsin’s small group insurance market. Equality Wisconsin co-founded the 2006 Fair Wisconsin campaign with Action Wisconsin.
Briefly describe your project or programs that would be funded.: 
Building on our program recognized by Wisconsin Community Fund in its Annual Report, the LGBT-Latino Family Unity campaign hopes to win progress by building on common values. Public policy should support family unity and the government should not be tearing families apart, whether by deportation or imposing antigay immigration barriers to same-sex binational couples. LGBT people and Latinos, who face the very same enemies in the Wisconsin Legislature (where the same legislators sponsor anti-immigrant and antigay bills), should organize to prevent extremists from deciding whose families in our society are "legitimate." Successes include helping pass a statewide domestic partner law, and supporting Voces de la Frontera, Wisconsin's premier immigrant rights organization, in winning in-state tuition for immigrant students at Wisconsin state universities (the only such victory in the nation in 2009), and a joint op-ed published in the Journal Sentinel signed by the leaders of Equality Wisconsin and Voces de la Frontera. We are proud to report that the original Equality Wisconsin organizer of our LGBT-Latino program, JoCasta Zamarripa, was recently elected as the first Latina to the Wisconsin State Assembly. With WCF support, an Equality Wisconsin organizer will continue to cultivate solidarity, encouraging non-Latino LGBT people to stand with Latinos on immigration and other issues, and encourage nongay Latinos to support LGBT equality and create a more welcoming community for LGBT Latinas and Latinos. Tactics include issue-based house parties, a joint public forum, and mobilizing Equality WI supporters through our email action center: 1.House Parties: the LGBT-Latino Family Unity campaign includes awareness-raising non-fundraising house parties hosted by volunteers recruited by an Equality WI organizer. The goal of the house parties, modeled after a similar initiative by Planned Parenthood on reproductive choice issues, is to provide nongay Latinos an opportunity to discuss issues of LGBT equality in a safe, comfortable environment. The Equality Wisconsin organizer will also work to elevate the voices of LGBT Latina and Latino leaders active in the LGBT-Family Unity campaign. 2. Joint Public Forum. To increase solidarity and understanding between the Latino and gay communities, the Equality Wisconsin organizer will partner with allies to host an educational panel comprised of a non-Hispanic LGBT leader, a nongay leader in Milwaukee’s Latino community, and an openly gay or lesbian Hispanic. The audience will be recruited from all three communities. 3.Email Action Center. Equality Wisconsin has 5,000 email supporters recruited from LGBT equality campaigns. The organizer will work to educate and involve these supporters in non-gay-identified issues that impact Latinos in solidarity actions.
Names of lead staff people and board members: 
Lizzi Dahlk, Project Manager
Ray Vahey, Jose Salazar, Amy Kistner, Kathleen Mulligan-Hansel, Rev. Andrew Warner
Focus area of project: 
racism
Have you read the grant guidelines?: 
I Have read the grant guidelines
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